Personal Productivity – 3 Tips For Personal Productivity Improvement

Need to boost your work output and minimize the amount of time you spend head down in your papers? Every professional wants to improve their productivity, and while thousands invest in tools and strategies that have the potential to help them, few actually see any substantial gains from them.

These three tips are designed to work on the opposite principles of most productivity theories. They don’t force you to adopt behavior that makes you uncomfortable, they encourage you to work to your strengths.

Invest in these tips and you’ll see your productivity increase without the needless expense of your work comfort.

Personal Productivity Guide #1: Ignore external advice or information.

Sounds silly, doesn’t it? Here I am giving you advice, and you’re supposed to ignore it. However, it all makes sense.

When you’re working, there are hundreds of distractions out there waiting to take away your time.

Allocate yourself time to work and ignore any external information or advice. In the digital age, we’re surrounded by information, and the real key to personal productivity improvement is the ability to distance ourselves from that information.

Personal Productivity Guide #2: Create ‘standards’ for your day.

Need to work four hours per afternoon? Allot that time on your daily schedule, but don’t stop there. Mark down when you’re going to eat dinner, when you’re going to brush your teeth, and the exact time that you’re going to get out of bed.

By forcing yourself to stick to a rigorous schedule in other parts of your life, you’ll find it much easier to focus on work in its allotted time slot.

Personal Productivity Guide #3: Audit your weekly output.

At the end of the day, ask yourself a simple question: “What have I achieved today?” Don’t just stop with the question though, take stock of what you’ve achieved and write it down.

Keep a spreadsheet and make sure that your work output is constantly on the up-and-up. By monitoring your output, you can set simple targets for the coming days, weeks and months of work.

Secrets to Personal Productivity

To achieve optimal personal productivity, one must be aware of himself, the situation as well as the other party. Who are the other party? They can be your co-workers, bosses, director, vendor, etc. in a workplace context. We can also describe personal productivity as an awareness of three things: Me, You and Situation. This is not something special and it had been mentioned in Sun Tzu’s Art of War quote:

It is said that if you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles; if you do not know your enemies but do know yourself, you will win one and lose one; if you do not know your enemies nor yourself, you will be imperiled in every single battle.

In our modern day context, we are not trying to win a war. We know “war” is too costly (it’s all in the news). The fundamental objective is to achieve personal productivity through understanding ourselves, the other party and the situation. Understanding ourselves involves awareness of our choices of actions, responses, our thinking, self-discipline and exertion of self-control. Strengthening the “me” is our core principle of understanding oneself. Understanding the other party involves awareness of their thoughts, anticipated responses within the given situation. We cannot change the perspective of another person, working styles, life’s need or nor a situation, but what we can do is to prepare our state of mind and body to adapt and handle various situations when they arise. Through this, we can “position” ourselves and influence any decisions and outcome. It goes the same when you enter the wrong “position”, the results are negative consequences.

How does it have any relation with improving personal productivity? Chances of us knowing the other party (or person) and situation dynamics is limited. But we have awareness and control of ourselves. Having being able to control what we can, we then anticipate and influence what is out of our control. Understanding oneself is one part of the equation to personal productivity. To further enhance personal productivity, it is necessary to complete the other half of the equation: understanding and reacting appropriately to other’s behavior in different situations. Sun Tzu’s Art of War quotes have been widely used in the business world. In our context, we bring it a level down to for the purpose of enhancing personal productivity at work.

Throughout the journey of finding productivity (is it work or life) with us, you will find that we begin working on one’s personal awareness and self-control (Me factor). Following through to understanding of the other party (You factor) and handling of situation dynamics (Situation factor). You will find what’s written here able to address your needs, if you have trouble finding personal productivity at work or having a grumpy boss always concerned with your performance. Simple as the concept is, we believed that what we are sharing here will be helpful in your search of personal productivity at work.

Personal Productivity Tips – How to Maximize Personal Productivity

There are thousands of productivity tips and tricks out there, each with varying levels of success and utility.

While these tips can help us shave a couple of minutes off of every hour and make certain processes easier, they often end up holding us up, tricking us into thinking our lives are more optimized than they really are, and betray the true meaning and philosophy behind productivity.

The best way to maximize personal productivity isn’t to invest your time in hundreds of tips and tricks, micro-optimizations and minor changes — it’s to completely overhaul the way you work.

That starts with employing some kind of philosophy to your work. Whether that means dividing your day time between work and personal time, or sectioning off time periods for uber-efficient and focused work, doesn’t matter.

What matters is that those changes produce some kind of measurable output. Invest in the mindset that gets you working hard and measure your output mercilessly. Discard the information that micro-changes can bring you and instead focus on the things that truly matter: behavior and setting.

For some, the best way to maximize personal productivity is by spending their work time in a setting that produces results for them.

For others, setting isn’t a problem, and a greater change to their work behavior and style is required. Whatever the case, these major changes are what introduce huge increases in productivity, not the tiny tips and tricks that only shave second off every minute and fool us into thinking we’re more productive than we really are.

Focus on those big optimizations, ignore the small stuff, and watch your work output massively increase.

There’s a sea of information out there, and the secrets to personal productivity don’t rest in embracing it; they rest in selectively ignoring it.

Best Life Coach for Personal Productivity

How is your personal productivity? Are you satisfied with what you are accomplishing? Do you wish you could do more? Is doing more possible? Those are some of the questions a coach would ask. We use the phrase best life coach in the title to accentuate the concept of living one’s best life.

When people are happy with how productive they are on a daily basis, they have a sense of satisfaction at the end of every day. They may suffer setbacks. But they realize that setbacks are inevitable.

If they are constantly ending the day with a feeling of disappointment, something is wrong. They might have set goals that are too high, impossible to achieve on a daily basis. Often though, the problem is that they failed to set any short-term goals at all.

Setting realistic goals is important, but not as important as defining personal productivity goals in the first place. If you have yet to define your goals, take some time to sit down and put them on paper.

In a quiet, unstressed setting, think about where you want to be in 10 years. Then move backwards in time. Think of it as if you were planning a car trip. What are the paths you will take to reach your ten-year goal?

A business coach would tell a company owner to do the same thing. 10 years is not the longest period of time that can be chosen. It is just an arbitrary number.

An individual might want to think in terms of retirement. “I want to be able to retire in 20 years with ample income from my investments to support me for the rest of my life.” That’s an example of an individual long-term goal.

Companies have different goals. There are profits to be made. Sales goals need to be defined. Plans for expanding may be a consideration.

There are many different things to consider. A business coach might talk to owners about their own personal productivity. The owners may want their employees to be more productive. While we often talk about looking at the big picture, it is important to look at the smaller parts. Those smaller parts combine to make up the big picture.

A business coach is helpful because of the unbiased viewpoint. A person inside of an organization has preconceived notions. He or she might think that it is the person down the hall who needs to be more productive.

An unbiased person can look at the scene and see something completely different. Think your personal productivity is good? Ask someone else to take a look.